The Great Election Fraud: Will Our Freedoms Survive Another Election?

The Rutherford Institute

And so it begins again, the never-ending, semi-delusional, train-wreck of an election cycle in which the American people allow themselves to get worked up into a frenzy over the misguided belief that the future of this nation—nay, our very lives—depends on who we elect as president.

For the next three months, Americans will be dope-fed billions of dollars’ worth of political propaganda aimed at keeping them glued to their television sets and persuading them that 1) their votes count and 2) electing the right candidate will fix everything that is wrong with this country.  

Incredible, isn’t it, that in a country of more than 330 million people, we are given only two choices for president? How is it that in a country teeming with creative, intelligent, productive, responsible, moral people, our vote too often comes down to pulling the lever for the lesser of two evils?

The system is rigged, of course.

It is a heavily scripted, tightly choreographed, star-studded, ratings-driven, mass-marketed, costly exercise in how to sell a product—in this case, a presidential candidate—to dazzled consumers who will choose image over substance almost every time.

As author Noam Chomsky rightly observed, “It is important to bear in mind that political campaigns are designed by the same people who sell toothpaste and cars.”…

The War for Dependence

International Man

No, that’s not a typo.

In 1776, residents of the American colonies took the very risky step of going to war with a then-powerful Britain – a War for Independence.

At that time, it was quite a courageous act, one that was a direct result of grievances:

Taxation: Colonists were angry over increased taxation, which at that time was only about 1%. But they got little in return, as the UK did not defend them against the native Americans. Colonists were instructed to sort out their own protection.

Production: The colonists were also angry because most of their export product went to the UK and they were paid very little for it, whilst goods shipped from England to the colonies carried a high price, which often left the colonists in debt to English exporters.

Self-determination: But they particularly resented the fact that, although the colonies functioned quite well on their own, and local representatives in the House of Burgesses were entirely capable of establishing law for the colonies, the UK made the bigger legislative decisions. These decisions were often regarded as arbitrary or usurious.

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